List of Connectives

using connectives

In debates, it is important to remain dispassionate and to use logical and factual information. This can and usually does increase the length of your sentences and detail within paragraphs. To avoid losing the attention of your audience you ought to try and link your paragraphs together so that it follows and rational flow of ideas and you can magnify the effect of your argument.

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Connecting paragraphs

Apart from using the linking words / phrases above, showing the link between paragraphs could involve writing ‘hand-holding’ sentences. These are sentences that link back to the ideas of the previous paragraph. For instance, when outlining the positive and negative issues about a topic you could use the following: Example (from beginning of previous paragraph):

One of the main advantages of X is . . .

One of the positive effects of X is . . .

When you are ready to move your discussion to the negative issues, you could write one of the following as a paragraph opener: Example:

Having considered the positive effects of X, negative issues may now need to be taken into account . . .

Despite the positive effects outlined above, there are also negative issues to be considered . . .

It is always important to make paragraphs part of a coherent whole text; they must not be isolated units unrelated to the whole piece. ’Do not expect your reader to make the connection between your ideas, but make those connections explicit. This way, the reader will be lead in a logical order through your argument and will be reminded of your current theme or angle.’ (Gillett, Hammond, & Martala, 2009) Checking for paragraph links in your own work When you are editing your next written assignment, ask yourself the following questions as you read through your work:

  • Does the start of my paragraph give my reader enough information about what the paragraph will be about?
  • Does my paragraph add to or elaborate on a point made previously and, if so, have I made this explicit with an appropriate linking word / phrase?
  • Does my paragraph introduce a completely new point or a different viewpoint to before and, if so, have I explicitly shown this with a suitable connective?
  • Have I used similar connectives repeatedly? (If yes, may need to vary them using the above list.)

A simple list of connectives

Summary
in brief
in conclusion
overall
throughout
in all

summarising
recapitulating
on the whole
to sum up
in short

Conclusion
finally
after all
in the end
in conclusion
to conclude
ultimately
to sum up

Illustrating
for example
for instance
in other words
such as
in the case of
as revealed by
that is to say
to show that
thus

Emphasising
specifically
in particular
above all
in fact
indeed
explicitly
more importantly
undoubtedly
certainly
definitely

Cause and Effect
because
therefore
consequently
when
eventually
accordingly
as
so
efectively
thus
as a result
until
inevitably

Comparing
comparatively
likewise
in contrast
compared with
(in comparison)
equally
as with
like
similarly
to balance this
an equivalent

Contrast
whereas
alternatively
unlike
however
still
on the contrary
on the other hand
by the way of
in contrast
instead
otherwise
instead of
nevertheless

Adding
and
as well as
moreover
what is more
too
and then
in addition
as well as
furthermore
…also…

Illustrating
for example
for instance
in other words
such as
in the case of
as revealed by
that is to say
to show that
thus

 

 

 

 

 

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